Professional Development Courses

February 11, 2019

1. Scenario-based Agricultural Risk Assessment

8:00 am  -  5:00 pm
2019-02-11 07:59:00 2019-02-11 17:00:00 America/Phoenix 1. Scenario-based Agricultural Risk Assessment Instructors: John Balog, BS, RBP, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD Susan Harper, DVM, DACLAM, DACVPM, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD David White, DVM, PhD, RBP, DACVM, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Ames, IA Bruce Whitney, PhD, Texas A&M University System, College Station, TX The instructors will review general concepts and considerations for assessing risks encountered in research programs that involve animals, plants, pathogens, pests, facilities, equipment, and work practices relevant to agriculture. The focus of the course will be on hazard identification and risk assessment (qualitative and quantitative), with discussion on how the strategic use of management practices can be used to minimize risks. Interactive exercises, specifically designed to incorporate unique challenges and hazards routinely encountered in agricultural research programs, will be used to guide attendees through the risk assessment process and illustrate key factors that influence selection of biocontainment and biosecurity measures to protect workers, the environment, and public health. The use of real-world case studies will provide opportunities for discussion and exchange of ideas that reinforce practical application of knowledge, information, and concepts covered through formal presentations, and an attendee’s actual experience in identifying and assessing research-related risks. Scenarios will be provided for discussion and assessment that focus on the critical aspects of agricultural risk assessment that differ from other described processes: the potential economic impact on local or regional animal and plant morbidity and mortality; and the international trade implications of disease presence in the country. Objectives: Construct risk assessments for working with agricultural agents and/or animals at various levels of biocontainment, including foreign animal (i.e., transboundary) diseases, in limited resource areas, and contrast with considerations for resource-rich areas Develop practices and procedures appropriate for mitigating the risk of working with agriculturally-important agents and/or animals infected with various pathogens Assess a facility’s ability to contain the agriculturally important agents or animals infected with various pathogens (ABSL1-4, BSL-3Ag, BL1-4P) Suggested Background: Fundamentals of Biosafety, Risk Assessment, Biosafety Level 3-Design and Operations, Principles & Practices of Biosafety Target Audience: Biosafety Professionals, Animal Caretakers, All Safety Professionals Audience Level: All levels Hilton Baltimore, Baltimore, MD USDA ARS 5th International Biosafety & Biocontainment Symposium: Biorisk and Facility Challenges in Agriculture [email protected]

Instructors:
John Balog, BS, RBP, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD
Susan Harper, DVM, DACLAM, DACVPM, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD
David White, DVM, PhD, RBP, DACVM, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Ames, IA
Bruce Whitney, PhD, Texas A&M University System, College Station, TX

The instructors will review general concepts and considerations for assessing risks encountered in research programs that involve animals, plants, pathogens, pests, facilities, equipment, and work practices relevant to agriculture. The focus of the course will be on hazard identification and risk assessment (qualitative and quantitative), with discussion on how the strategic use of management practices can be used to minimize risks. Interactive exercises, specifically designed to incorporate unique challenges and hazards routinely encountered in agricultural research programs, will be used to guide attendees through the risk assessment process and illustrate key factors that influence selection of biocontainment and biosecurity measures to protect workers, the environment, and public health. The use of real-world case studies will provide opportunities for discussion and exchange of ideas that reinforce practical application of knowledge, information, and concepts covered through formal presentations, and an attendee’s actual experience in identifying and assessing research-related risks. Scenarios will be provided for discussion and assessment that focus on the critical aspects of agricultural risk assessment that differ from other described processes: the potential economic impact on local or regional animal and plant morbidity and mortality; and the international trade implications of disease presence in the country.

Objectives:

  • Construct risk assessments for working with agricultural agents and/or animals at various levels of biocontainment, including foreign animal (i.e., transboundary) diseases, in limited resource areas, and contrast with considerations for resource-rich areas
  • Develop practices and procedures appropriate for mitigating the risk of working with agriculturally-important agents and/or animals infected with various pathogens
  • Assess a facility’s ability to contain the agriculturally important agents or animals infected with various pathogens (ABSL1-4, BSL-3Ag, BL1-4P)

Suggested Background: Fundamentals of Biosafety, Risk Assessment, Biosafety Level 3-Design and Operations, Principles & Practices of Biosafety

Target Audience: Biosafety Professionals, Animal Caretakers, All Safety Professionals

Audience Level: All levels

2. Animal Disease Response Training: Kansas State University National Agricultural Biosecurity Center

8:00 am  -  12:00 pm
2019-02-11 08:00:00 2019-02-11 12:00:00 America/Phoenix 2. Animal Disease Response Training: Kansas State University National Agricultural Biosecurity Center Instructors: Craig Beardsley, MS, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS Ken Burton, DVM, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS It is estimated that more than 100,000 veterinary and non-veterinary responders would be needed over time in a large-scale Foot and Mouth Disease outbreak. USDA/APHIS statistics show that over 3,200 state, federal, and contracted personnel were involved in just the first six months of response to the recent Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza outbreak. These numbers reflect a serious challenge to provide adequate veterinary and non-veterinary personnel trained in animal disease response. Individuals in the animal health industry (feedlot cowboys, livestock producers, rendering and packing plant employees and extension personnel), animal health companies, and local emergency response personnel, if properly trained, can provide a valuable source of qualified animal disease response personnel in the event of a high-consequence transboundary animal disease outbreak. This course provides information needed to minimize effects of such an outbreak. Instructors will focus on best practices and safety issues associated with an agriculture emergency, including quarantine, biosecurity, euthanasia and disposal, use of personal protective equipment, and cleaning and disinfection. This course also assists in increasing coordination of responders across jurisdictions, lines of authority, and disciplines by examining the integration of response efforts. Objectives: Explain the need for pre-planning and animal disease response training Restate the best practices for responding to an agricultural disease emergency Describe the needs and actions necessary to ensure coordination between responders from various disciplines, agencies and governmental levels Suggested Background: Familiarity with animal health industry Target Audience: Responder groups including, but not limited to, Emergency Management Agencies, Emergency Medical Services, Veterinarians, Agriculture Emergency Responders, Fire Fighters, Law Enforcement, Producers, Agricultural Industries, Public Health, Public Works, Environmental Agencies, Elected Officials Audience Level: Basic Hilton Baltimore, Baltimore, MD USDA ARS 5th International Biosafety & Biocontainment Symposium: Biorisk and Facility Challenges in Agriculture [email protected]

Instructors:
Craig Beardsley, MS, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS
Ken Burton, DVM, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS

It is estimated that more than 100,000 veterinary and non-veterinary responders would be needed over time in a large-scale Foot and Mouth Disease outbreak. USDA/APHIS statistics show that over 3,200 state, federal, and contracted personnel were involved in just the first six months of response to the recent Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza outbreak. These numbers reflect a serious challenge to provide adequate veterinary and non-veterinary personnel trained in animal disease response. Individuals in the animal health industry (feedlot cowboys, livestock producers, rendering and packing plant employees and extension personnel), animal health companies, and local emergency response personnel, if properly trained, can provide a valuable source of qualified animal disease response personnel in the event of a high-consequence transboundary animal disease outbreak. This course provides information needed to minimize effects of such an outbreak. Instructors will focus on best practices and safety issues associated with an agriculture emergency, including quarantine, biosecurity, euthanasia and disposal, use of personal protective equipment, and cleaning and disinfection. This course also assists in increasing coordination of responders across jurisdictions, lines of authority, and disciplines by examining the integration of response efforts.

Objectives:

  • Explain the need for pre-planning and animal disease response training
  • Restate the best practices for responding to an agricultural disease emergency
  • Describe the needs and actions necessary to ensure coordination between responders from various disciplines, agencies and governmental levels

Suggested Background: Familiarity with animal health industry

Target Audience: Responder groups including, but not limited to, Emergency Management Agencies, Emergency Medical Services, Veterinarians, Agriculture Emergency Responders, Fire Fighters, Law Enforcement, Producers, Agricultural Industries, Public Health, Public Works, Environmental Agencies, Elected Officials

Audience Level: Basic

3. Biosecurity 101

8:00 am  -  12:00 pm
2019-02-11 08:01:00 2019-02-11 12:00:00 America/Phoenix 3. Biosecurity 101 Instructors: Ryan Burnette, PhD, Merrick & Company, Greenwood Village, CO Donald Callihan, PhD, Merrick & Company, Greenwood Village, CO Kort Dickson, Perdue Farms, Inc., Salisbury, MD Stephen Goldsmith, DVM, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Washington, DC Kelsie Judd, Merrick & Company, Greenwood Village, CO Lauren Richardson, DVM, DACVPM, Merrick & Company, Greenwood Village, CO The field of biosafety has evolved from a primary focus on biomedical research intended to reduce exposure of laboratory workers, their communities, and the environment to infectious biological risks to supporting the activities of a wide variety of biological, clinical, veterinary, industrial, and diagnostic laboratories around the world. As the threat landscape directed at laboratories and biological assets has changed, the need to secure them from outsider and insider threats has led to creation of a parallel, but distinct, practice of biosecurity. This course is intended to describe biosafety and biosecurity and to define the fundamental differences between the knowledge and analytical skills required of biosafety (risk-based) and biosecurity (threat-based) assessments. Objectives: Describe the elements of risk-based (biosafety) and threat-based (biosecurity) programs fundamental to implementing a comprehensive biorisk management program Recognize threats and vulnerabilities to consider when protecting laboratory materials from unauthorized access, loss, theft, misuse, diversion, or intentional release Restate and use the five pillars of biosecurity (personnel, transport, material, physical, and information) to recognize gaps and opportunities for biosecurity program improvement Suggested Background: None Target Audience: Professionals in biosafety, security, and laboratory management and practice Audience Level: Basic Hilton Baltimore, Baltimore, MD USDA ARS 5th International Biosafety & Biocontainment Symposium: Biorisk and Facility Challenges in Agriculture [email protected]

Instructors:
Ryan Burnette, PhD, Merrick & Company, Greenwood Village, CO
Donald Callihan, PhD, Merrick & Company, Greenwood Village, CO
Kort Dickson, Perdue Farms, Inc., Salisbury, MD
Stephen Goldsmith, DVM, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Washington, DC
Kelsie Judd, Merrick & Company, Greenwood Village, CO
Lauren Richardson, DVM, DACVPM, Merrick & Company, Greenwood Village, CO

The field of biosafety has evolved from a primary focus on biomedical research intended to reduce exposure of laboratory workers, their communities, and the environment to infectious biological risks to supporting the activities of a wide variety of biological, clinical, veterinary, industrial, and diagnostic laboratories around the world. As the threat landscape directed at laboratories and biological assets has changed, the need to secure them from outsider and insider threats has led to creation of a parallel, but distinct, practice of biosecurity. This course is intended to describe biosafety and biosecurity and to define the fundamental differences between the knowledge and analytical skills required of biosafety (risk-based) and biosecurity (threat-based) assessments.

Objectives:

  • Describe the elements of risk-based (biosafety) and threat-based (biosecurity) programs fundamental to implementing a comprehensive biorisk management program
  • Recognize threats and vulnerabilities to consider when protecting laboratory materials from unauthorized access, loss, theft, misuse, diversion, or intentional release
  • Restate and use the five pillars of biosecurity (personnel, transport, material, physical, and information) to recognize gaps and opportunities for biosecurity program improvement

Suggested Background: None

Target Audience: Professionals in biosafety, security, and laboratory management and practice

Audience Level: Basic

4. Risks of Deferred Maintenance in High-Containment Facilities

8:00 am  -  12:00 pm
2019-02-11 08:02:00 2019-02-11 12:00:00 America/Phoenix 4. Risks of Deferred Maintenance in High-Containment Facilities Instructors: Miguel Grimaldo, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX John Henneman, MS, RBP, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS Many biocontainment research facilities have limitations with funding and budgets for maintenance which are often the first to be cut. Sometimes, necessary maintenance needs are postponed or not done at all. This course will discuss ways to sustain maintenance to avoid running equipment to a failure point, options and lessons learned in prioritizing what equipment to fix first, and examples of how value engineering can come back to haunt you. Long-term planning can be a challenge without fixed budget allocations. Information on defining and starting a maintenance plan will be shared, along with suggestions for creating a culture of responsibility and ownership for the maintenance staff. Discussions will include options to consider when creating priorities, knowing the critical equipment, estimating some type of budget, and establishing a facility risk assessment to maintain safe operations. Objectives: Describe the consequences of postponing critical maintenance Identify the basic steps in forming a maintenance plan Define the critical equipment for your facility Suggested Background: None Target Audience: Biosafety Professionals, Facility Managers, Facility Engineers Audience Level: Basic Hilton Baltimore, Baltimore, MD USDA ARS 5th International Biosafety & Biocontainment Symposium: Biorisk and Facility Challenges in Agriculture [email protected]

Instructors:
Miguel Grimaldo, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX
John Henneman, MS, RBP, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS

Many biocontainment research facilities have limitations with funding and budgets for maintenance which are often the first to be cut. Sometimes, necessary maintenance needs are postponed or not done at all. This course will discuss ways to sustain maintenance to avoid running equipment to a failure point, options and lessons learned in prioritizing what equipment to fix first, and examples of how value engineering can come back to haunt you. Long-term planning can be a challenge without fixed budget allocations. Information on defining and starting a maintenance plan will be shared, along with suggestions for creating a culture of responsibility and ownership for the maintenance staff. Discussions will include options to consider when creating priorities, knowing the critical equipment, estimating some type of budget, and establishing a facility risk assessment to maintain safe operations.

Objectives:

  • Describe the consequences of postponing critical maintenance
  • Identify the basic steps in forming a maintenance plan
  • Define the critical equipment for your facility

Suggested Background: None

Target Audience: Biosafety Professionals, Facility Managers, Facility Engineers

Audience Level: Basic

5. Implementing Biosecurity Solutions

1:00 pm  -  5:00 pm
2019-02-11 13:00:00 2019-02-11 17:00:00 America/Phoenix 5. Implementing Biosecurity Solutions Instructors: Ryan Burnette, PhD, Merrick & Company, Greenwood Village, CO Donald Callihan, PhD, Merrick & Company, Greenwood Village, CO Kort Dickson, Perdue Farms, Inc., Salisbury, MD Stephen Goldsmith, DVM, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Washington, DC Kelsie Judd, Merrick & Company, Greenwood Village, CO Lauren Richardson, DVM, DACVPM, Merrick & Company, Greenwood Village, CO Understanding of the tenets of biosecurity is vital to develop practical strategies and solutions at the facility and organizational level. Awareness of global health security has led to increased international development efforts to improve laboratory capacity; this presents unique challenges for biosecurity. This course will focus on practical strategies for implementing basic biosecurity in a variety of environments, including research, agriculture, industry, and international development. Objectives: Recognize the agencies and organizations with stakeholder roles in biosecurity Define practical strategies for integrating functional security within biorisk management using an Integrated Security Management Plan (ISP) at the facility level Suggested Background: Biosecurity 101 (course 1 described above) or similar      Target Audience: Professionals in biosafety, security, laboratory management and practice, life sciences policy, and international development          Audience Level: Basic/Intermediate Hilton Baltimore, Baltimore, MD USDA ARS 5th International Biosafety & Biocontainment Symposium: Biorisk and Facility Challenges in Agriculture [email protected]

Instructors:
Ryan Burnette, PhD, Merrick & Company, Greenwood Village, CO
Donald Callihan, PhD, Merrick & Company, Greenwood Village, CO
Kort Dickson, Perdue Farms, Inc., Salisbury, MD
Stephen Goldsmith, DVM, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Washington, DC
Kelsie Judd, Merrick & Company, Greenwood Village, CO
Lauren Richardson, DVM, DACVPM, Merrick & Company, Greenwood Village, CO

Understanding of the tenets of biosecurity is vital to develop practical strategies and solutions at the facility and organizational level. Awareness of global health security has led to increased international development efforts to improve laboratory capacity; this presents unique challenges for biosecurity. This course will focus on practical strategies for implementing basic biosecurity in a variety of environments, including research, agriculture, industry, and international development.

Objectives:

  • Recognize the agencies and organizations with stakeholder roles in biosecurity
  • Define practical strategies for integrating functional security within biorisk management using an Integrated Security Management Plan (ISP) at the facility level

Suggested Background: Biosecurity 101 (course 1 described above) or similar     

Target Audience: Professionals in biosafety, security, laboratory management and practice, life sciences policy, and international development         

Audience Level: Basic/Intermediate

6. Introduction to Strategic Leadership Principles for Biorisk Management

1:00 pm  -  5:00 pm
2019-02-11 13:01:00 2019-02-11 17:00:00 America/Phoenix 6. Introduction to Strategic Leadership Principles for Biorisk Management Instructors: Joseph Kanabrocki, PhD, CBSP, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL Joseph Kozlovac, MS, RBP, CBSP, SM(NRCM), U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD Neal Woollen, DVM, PhD, National Strategic Research Institute, University of Nebraska, Omaha, NE This course will provide attendees the opportunity to explore strategic elements of microbiological and biomedical laboratory operations that impact, and are impacted by, biosafety and biosecurity decision making. Attendee participation will be maximized during instructor-led discussions focused on the learning objectives below. Objectives: Describe today’s biosafety and biosecurity strategic environment and why it matters Discuss what it means to be a high-reliability organization for biosafety and biosecurity Identify why critical thinking and systems thinking matter Recognize how to manage strategic risk and the challenges of organizational transformation Illustrate the relevance of managing human and social capital Define what is important to strategic communications and why it matters Suggested Background: None Target Audience: Biosafety professionals, all levels of leaders at biocontainment and life sciences laboratories, research scientists Audience Level: Intermediate Hilton Baltimore, Baltimore, MD USDA ARS 5th International Biosafety & Biocontainment Symposium: Biorisk and Facility Challenges in Agriculture [email protected]

Instructors:
Joseph Kanabrocki, PhD, CBSP, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL
Joseph Kozlovac, MS, RBP, CBSP, SM(NRCM), U.S. Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD
Neal Woollen, DVM, PhD, National Strategic Research Institute, University of Nebraska, Omaha, NE

This course will provide attendees the opportunity to explore strategic elements of microbiological and biomedical laboratory operations that impact, and are impacted by, biosafety and biosecurity decision making. Attendee participation will be maximized during instructor-led discussions focused on the learning objectives below.

Objectives:

  • Describe today’s biosafety and biosecurity strategic environment and why it matters
  • Discuss what it means to be a high-reliability organization for biosafety and biosecurity
  • Identify why critical thinking and systems thinking matter
  • Recognize how to manage strategic risk and the challenges of organizational transformation
  • Illustrate the relevance of managing human and social capital
  • Define what is important to strategic communications and why it matters

Suggested Background: None

Target Audience: Biosafety professionals, all levels of leaders at biocontainment and life sciences laboratories, research scientists

Audience Level: Intermediate

7. Waste Management

1:00 pm  -  5:00 pm
2019-02-11 13:02:00 2019-02-11 17:00:00 America/Phoenix 7. Waste Management Instructors: Eilyn Fabregas, MS, RBP, U.S. Department of Agriculture—APHIS, Riverdale, MD Gerald Houvener, MPH, CIH, CSP, U.S. Department of Agriculture—APHIS, Riverdale, MD Daniel Weissman, PE, CHMM, CSP, U.S. Department of Agriculture—APHIS, Riverdale, MD Attendees will learn various laboratory or facility biological, chemical, radioactive, waste management strategies and technologies available both in the laboratory setting, final disposal, and anywhere in between (e.g., temporary storage, shipping and transport) while considering location-specific needs and resources. Readily-available U.S. and international regulations and/or guidance documents, such as but not limited to: International Air Transport Association (IATA) Dangerous Goods Regulations, WHO Laboratory Biosafety Manual, CWA 15793 Laboratory Biorisk Management, FAO Laboratory Mapping Tool-Safety Module, and Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories (BMBL) as they relate to waste management will be discussed. Objectives: Identify types of waste and available waste management strategies, including treatment and transportation options, for the laboratory/facility setting Communicate the necessity of the program Identify the value in obtaining stakeholder buy-in Suggested Background: None Target Audience: Biosafety Officers, Safety Professionals, Environmental Management and Waste Management Professionals, Principal Investigators, Facility Managers Audience Level: Basic/Intermediate   Hilton Baltimore, Baltimore, MD USDA ARS 5th International Biosafety & Biocontainment Symposium: Biorisk and Facility Challenges in Agriculture [email protected]

Instructors:
Eilyn Fabregas, MS, RBP, U.S. Department of Agriculture—APHIS, Riverdale, MD
Gerald Houvener, MPH, CIH, CSP, U.S. Department of Agriculture—APHIS, Riverdale, MD
Daniel Weissman, PE, CHMM, CSP, U.S. Department of Agriculture—APHIS, Riverdale, MD

Attendees will learn various laboratory or facility biological, chemical, radioactive, waste management strategies and technologies available both in the laboratory setting, final disposal, and anywhere in between (e.g., temporary storage, shipping and transport) while considering location-specific needs and resources. Readily-available U.S. and international regulations and/or guidance documents, such as but not limited to: International Air Transport Association (IATA) Dangerous Goods Regulations, WHO Laboratory Biosafety Manual, CWA 15793 Laboratory Biorisk Management, FAO Laboratory Mapping Tool-Safety Module, and Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories (BMBL) as they relate to waste management will be discussed.

Objectives:

  • Identify types of waste and available waste management strategies, including treatment and transportation options, for the laboratory/facility setting
  • Communicate the necessity of the program
  • Identify the value in obtaining stakeholder buy-in

Suggested Background: None

Target Audience: Biosafety Officers, Safety Professionals, Environmental Management and Waste Management Professionals, Principal Investigators, Facility Managers

Audience Level: Basic/Intermediate